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The annual HIV Cruise Retreat, commonly referred to as "The Poz Cruise" (no association with POZ Magazine) will set sail this November 8-15 aboard the Ruby Princess, departing Los Angeles and cruising the Mexican Riviera cities of Mazatlan, Puerto Vallarta and Cabo San Lucas.

This year, though, there will be a somewhat ironic special guest on board: Timothy Ray Brown, the first man to be cured of HIV.

Timothy Crop 2"Timothy and his partner will be joining us, and we're thrilled," says cruise director Paul Stalbaum, a longtime HIV survivor and travel agent who began organizing the cruise over a decade ago. "He will participate in a presentation and Q&A on cure research and share his story with us. His personal grace and his public education efforts since becoming 'the Berlin Patient' are deeply admired. I know our passengers can't wait to meet him and have some fun on the Mexican Riviera."

Brown, co-founder of the Cure for AIDS Coalition and Cure Report, maintains that his identity hasn't really changed since his cure in 2007, the result of a stem cell transplant for the leukemia he was battling at the time. (The transplant donor had the CCR5 gene mutation that blocks HIV from entering human cells.)

While the procedure hasn't been successfully duplicated in other HIV patients precisely, it has led to advances in gene therapy treatments that incorporate what was learned from Brown's case.

"Remember, I was HIV positive twice as long as I have been cured," Brown says about joining the Poz Cruise. "I still consider myself part of the HIV community. I wouldn't have it any other way."

"There's something special that happens when so many people living with HIV are together," says Stalbaum of the hundreds of cruise articipants. "All the social walls that divide us just fall away. Our happy group of poz cruisers, who are often joined by their negative partners and family members, aren't concerned with HIV status or age or appearance. It creates an environment where true friendships--and, yes, even some romance--are free to bloom. Our group watches their friend list on social media explode after every cruise."

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe HIV Cruise Retreat brings together people living with HIV, their loved ones and allies for a week of exclusive theme parties, private excursions and educational events. While not a fully chartered ship like RSVP or Atlantis, the parties, events and even dinner arrangements for participants are exclusive.

Otherwise, says Stalbaum, "we mix with other people, just like in real life. And we're holding hands and feeling proud. We usually commandeer one of the pools on the first day, and it's quite a sight to watch the other passengers realize we are a colorful group indeed. A lot of the women on board ditch their husbands to hang out poolside with us instead. We're a lot more fun."

This will be the first time in seven years that the cruise has departed from the West Coast, and it's expected to be a sold-out cruise. Special group cabin rates are available until Feb. 28. More information, including video blogs from past cruises, is available at HIVCruise.com or through Paul Stalbaum at (954) 566-3377.

This article post originally appeared in Frontiers Magazine in Los Angeles. Timothy Ray Brown photo: Scott Taber. Cruise tubing photo: Brian Molenaar.

(My friends: Building community among those of us living with HIV is a passion of mine. I realize that although the cruise is reasonably priced it is also out of reach for some of my readers, and I hope you will understand my enthusiasm for supporting this event. This will be my 5th year to volunteer as MC of the cruise -- I pay for my expenses like everyone else -- and it has become a yearly vacation that I truly look forward to. I hope you will check it out! -- Mark)

Sean Strub and the Legacy of AIDS

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Before my interview with activist Sean Strub, author of Body Counts: A Memoir of Politics, Sex, AIDS, and Survival, let me share a revealing story.

It was late 2011 and my life was in shambles. The breakup of a long term relationship had sent me into a spiral, followed closely by a devastating drug addiction relapse. I had weathered the fallout and taken refuge at my mother's home in Louisiana.

Sean StrubAnd then came a phone call from Sean Strub, founder of POZ Magazine and lifelong advocate for those of us living with HIV. We were acquainted but not yet close friends and the request he made during the call surprised me. Would I be willing, he wondered, to come visit him for a few weeks and help get his new HIV anti-criminalization effort, The Sero Project, off the ground?

Sean had read a blog posting I had written about my breakup and relapse, and must have known I wasn't exactly firing on all cylinders. I was a recovering addict with a trail of wreckage in my recent past, and yet he wanted me to come work with him. Like, in his home.

Within days I drove 1,400 miles to his Pennsylvania town. I managed to get some work done but mostly I piddled around his home office, getting my bearings again while we traded war stories and gossip from across our desks. Sean was passionate about every topic and a great teacher on contemporary HIV advocacy issues.

Before long, the real purpose of Sean's long distance invitation became clear to me. He didn't really need much help, but he knew that I did. He saw someone with potential who would benefit from a little mentorship, encouragement, and a friend. And God, he was right. Our time together strengthened and refocused me. Since then, I have heard many stories about Sean Strub taking people under his wing and helping to lift them up to a better place.

My admiration makes it nearly impossible to objectively review his remarkable memoir, Body Counts. I am an unapologetic fan and grateful friend. That being said, you must finish reading this article and go directly to Amazon and buy his book.

Body Counts is one of the most wide-ranging and well written remembrances to come out of the AIDS crisis. It seamlessly combines the social, political, and sexual landscape of Sean's journey. It moved me to tears more than once, and taught me a lot about what happened behind the scenes during the dawn of the century's greatest public health crisis.

All that, and there's a ton of great celebrity stories about people like John and Yoko (Sean was there the night Lennon was shot), Andy Warhol, and a host of colorful others.

Sean agreed to a conversation to discuss everything from his memoir to body image, sexual abuse, the legacy of AIDS, and the state of the HIV community today.

Here is that conversation:

Body counts coverBody Counts is such a marvelous achievement, Sean. So much history here, personal and otherwise, and witnessed from such close proximity. Thanks for not holding back the juicy stuff about politicians and celebrities!

For better or worse, politicians and celebrities are intertwined with the history of the epidemic, in ways both bad and good. My perspective at times is unusual-like when I was running the "Senators Only" elevator in the U.S. Capitol-and I tried to present the humanity, good and bad, of those I write about.

Also, in terms of the epidemic, it was a conscious decision and key strategy to exploit celebrities to gain attention and action in response to the epidemic. Elizabeth Taylor knew this better than anyone and she was amazing at getting others to join her in spending their celebrity capital on behalf of something important.

And you're our tour guide through those years. I think your criticism of President Bill Clinton's AIDS response might be surprising to people. Aren't we supposed to love him?

Others have suggested that Clinton's post-presidency focus on the global epidemic is an effort to atone for his failing in this regard during his presidency. When salon.com published an excerpt from Body Counts that was about the Clinton Administration, it generated a lot of nasty comments. It was the epidemic driving a generation of gay men out of the closet and into activism that ultimately was critical to electing Bill Clinton, yet as soon as he was elected it seems like the air was let out of our activist balloon.

In some ways I think we-as a queer community-are more effective as outsiders, where we had to learn to survive, than we are as insiders, where we haven't been as welcome or skilled. When Clinton was elected, many of our leaders became insiders and didn't take everyone with them.

I'm glad you're not letting people off the hook. Was it important for you to save our AIDS history from those who might revision it?

Initially the impetus for writing Body Counts came from the realization that, as time passed, there were fewer and fewer of us around from the early days who could tell what happened first-hand. It was also a way of validating my own life. I didn't grow up wanting to be an AIDS activist; I had other plans, but in the early 80's my life was hijacked by the epidemic. WritingBody Counts gave me some understanding of why I made the choices I made.

But the more I dug into the history I also saw how those years have been misrepresented or misunderstood, particularly the role of people with AIDS and HIV. Grassroots community efforts are often dismissed, minimized or ignored.

Historical truth is always more complex than the simplified-and sometimes manipulated-version of popular history we are led to believe. The epidemic's history has been, to an extent, commodified, rewritten to serve some agenda.

I think it is important to have as many first-person accounts, especially from people with HIV who were on the frontlines, so our experiences get documented and preserved. And as time passes, there will be more archives available, with documents from those years that will tell an even fuller picture.

As we get more perspective, the epidemic and our response to it, is understood in new ways and that's a good thing.

The ongoing theme to your AIDS work, in fact, has been a respect and focus on people living with the virus themselves. You carry that banner fiercely.

I don't think the LGBT community, or people with HIV, have gotten the credit we deserve for what we did in those early years. How we came together to love and care for each other was something remarkable. We should the world our very best face and what we did then should be celebrated and recognized as a model, worthy of emulation in many kinds of situations. I also know that it was other people with HIV who comforted me, educated me and enabled me to survive.

The book is a reclamation on your body -- from shame about it, from infection, from the sexual abuse you suffered. Do you think it's a common challenge for gay men to love their physical selves?

The title, Body Counts, is an intentional double entendre, referring to the loss of life from the epidemic, of course, but also my personal lifelong struggle for control of my body. It has had many enemies: the Catholic church which taught me that they owned my body, sexual abusers who exploited me, a government that sought to control my sexual expression, HIV itself and even the drugs to treat HIV. It has gotten better over time, but shame-shedding doesn't happen in an instant, it is incremental and I suspect, for me, will be a lifelong process.

I can't imagine revisiting some of the trauma you describe in the book, such as childhood sexual abuse and a rape by a roommate. Was it brutal to write?

I wouldn't call revisiting those memories brutal, but it was at times emotionally draining. Ultimately, it was healthy for me to process pain, hurt, guilt and shame that I had carried for years.

You write that it took 20 years to recognize the rape for what it was. Do we have a problem as gay men seeing ourselves as victims of abuse?

When it happened I didn't even think of the word rape as having any applicability to men. I was still so ashamed of my sexual desire and also conflicted about the degree of responsibility I bore for what happened. For many years I blocked out the sexual abuse and sexual violence I had experienced; it made me uncomfortable to think about because I didn't think there was anything constructive I could do with those memories except feel bad about them.

Now I can look back and see that while I may have been precocious in some ways, I was incredibly naive and vulnerable in other ways. In the process, I not only forgave those who hurt me but I ended up, quite unexpectedly, forgiving myself as well.

You were absolutely on death's door for a few years, and squeaked through in time for new medications to save you. And you were outright defiant about showing the Karposi's Sarcoma (KS) lesions that covered your body during that time.

I think if more of my identity and self-worth had been found in my body I might have been more likely to pursue cosmetic treatments for the KS. And the objectification of bodies is practically in the DNA of gay culture. Even as I began to accept my own body, it was within a context that clearly told me the body I had wasn't a gay ideal. I'm skinny, have no chest and am not especially athletic.

On the other hand, not conforming to that ideal, not being as invested in it, made it perhaps a bit easier when my body become so obviously ravaged by AIDS and, especially, Kaposi's Sarcoma. Less of my self-identity was in my body, so its decline didn't degrade my self-worth as much as it might have for others.

I didn't treat the visible KS lesions because I knew there were no treatments that would slow their growth and I already spent too much time in doctors offices. That was almost unimaginable to many people who were horrified that I had visible lesions and took no steps to even disguise them with makeup.

I make the mistake of assuming people know that AIDS advocacy changed the entire patient/physician dynamic, or that our response to what we endured will forever be remembered. Obviously that isn't necessarily so, and why books like yours are important.

There is an understanding that AIDS has been different, in many ways, and has had a profound impact on the culture, society, the healthcare system, drug development and approval processes, even geopolitics. I don't think it is widely understood how different the epidemic might have been had it not been for the self-empowerment movement, or how truly radical those early PWA pioneers were.

While ACT UP has been an important part of my life and advocacy, so too has the advocacy that precedes ACT UP, that set the stage for our movement. That earliest history hasn't been as well studied or understood and I tried to give some attention to those years in Body Counts. Randy Shilts' And the Band Played On provide an important and detailed view of the early years from his vantage point in San Francisco; the story from those years in New York hasn't been nearly as thoroughly explored. Also, And the Band Played On was written before ACT UP came on the scene.

When you first arrived at the offices of a coalition of people with AIDS, you write about having found a place you belonged, at last, even after having begun a business career and worked in politics. What about it struck you so deeply?

Total solidarity. I felt so welcome and safe that it enabled me to overcome the fear of stigma. That's what I've tried to do for others ever since.

What are the greatest threats to people living with HIV today, or at least to the kind of empowerment groups for us that have been so important to you?

Lack of respect for the principle of patient autonomy. This is happening across the board, as public health becomes militarized, disease securitized and treatments more complex and costly. The concept of the physician as a healer, providing individualized treatment, has too often given way to the physician as an extension of and agent of the state and the pharmaceutical industry, treating populations instead of individuals.

You are known to be skeptical of pharma and caution that medication side effects are too often ignored. Some people might find that ironic, given that new medications saved your life. Is that fair?

I think skepticism about pharma, when it was pharmaceutical treatments that saved my life, isn't ironic but common sense. Anti-retrovirals, like many medicines, are powerful treatments. Anything very powerful can be used in a negative or positive way; the more powerful the more important it is to be careful, cautious and skeptical.

Skepticism saved my life. Had I not been so skeptical, I would have taken more treatments that, in hindsight, we now know would have hurt me more than helped me. I am alive because I was lucky or smart or skeptical enough to refuse pharmaceutical treatments at one point, when they were strongly recommended to me by the medical establishment, as well as because they were available to me and I took them at another point, when I needed them.

The irony isn't found in me. The irony is that a healthcare system that purports to heal and a scientific establishment that purports to be interested in discovery has so often refused to listen to or learn from those living with the disease. Had our voices been valued more highly, the epidemic would never have gotten as big as it has.

I'm a little surprised that your book is the first memoir by a major imprint about those early years in New York City and the early ACT UP era. What do you make of the recent interest on film about AIDS in the 1980's, such as How to Survive a Plagueand Dallas Buyers Club?

Enough time has past since the worst years that those who survived can reflect with greater objectivity. Many survivors feel compelled to remember the dead and bear witness to what we experienced. That has become a sense of obligation, even a compulsion, for many of us, particularly as we age and realize there are fewer and fewer of us around to speak first-hand about those years.

For many it is a delayed grieving; when friends were dying so fast and in such great numbers it wasn't possible to fully grieve them. But we filed away that pain, to process later. Now it is later.

The explosion in cultural production in the last few years, the films you mention as well as books and exhibitions, is somewhat analogous to the cultural production following the Holocaust. Not so much in the 40's and 50's, but by the early 60's it had started to grow dramatically. Yet 15 or 20 years past the worst of those days, the memories and words and testimonials start to come forth.

But even Dallas Buyers Club and other works of art haven't done well with their bottom line. We might be taking a look back, but it isn't exactly a highly commercial enterprise, is it?

No, it isn't, to many people anything about AIDS is such a downer they aren't interested. Many gay men have created lives that have protected them, emotionally, from the pain of the epidemic and they don't want to be reminded of it.

But I'm not sure we would be in any better position in terms of addressing the epidemic if the books and films about its earlier years were enormously profitable. There is an historical record that, in time, will be vastly more important than how many copies or tickets are sold today.

Body Counts seemingly has everything, from Washington politics to brushes with celebrity to your own sex life, and the book had major endorsements. I will admit I thought it would be a bestseller, and rightfully so. Or at least it should have been.

I suspect every author wishes their book sold better and I'm no exception. But while I didn't make the NY Times bestseller list, Body Counts has gotten excellent reviews -- almost across the board -- and hundreds of people who read it have contacted me with appreciative comments, which is cool.

The publisher early on told me she expected the book to have a long sale and she has been proven correct. It is getting assigned in college coursework and continues to sell, even though it has been a year since the original publication date.

College kids are studying your book? That has to be gratifying, and it sounds like the perfect use for your account of this history.

Yeah, that's cool, isn't it? I spoke at a dozen colleges and universities last year and found student audiences to be engaged, stimulating and helpful for keeping my own thinking fresh.

Strub_Body Counts_TP FINALThe cover artwork and even the subtitle of the book were changed for the paperback. Why?

The hardcover has a picture of me kissing Michael Misove, my partner who died in 1988 and the subtitle was "A Memoir of Politics, Sex, AIDS and Survival." For the paperback, the photograph was changed to one of a young and cute me looking directly at the camera. The thought was that the picture of Michael and me, while very sweet, may imply the book is about that one relationship between these two men and if someone wasn't interested in that they may pass on the book. The picture of just me alone wouldn't be so narrow.

The subtitle for the paperback was changed to "A Memoir of Politics, Activism and Survival" in the belief that the word "AIDS" may turn off some buyers. That was weird, but I think probably true. My point was and remains to get as many people to read the book as possible, so I was supportive of any change that would help achieve that goal.

So what next for you? I know you've been doing a book tour and events.

I want to continue working to help people with HIV find greater agency and empowerment, particularly through support of and strengthening of networks of people with HIV. In time, I think the self-empowerment advocacy will start to blur the lines of specific distinctions between diseases and conditions; it will be about a broader movement to take back healthcare and choices about our health and bodies from the corporate grip that has been so damaging to the lives and health of many.

I'm increasingly aware of the march of time. Is it too soon to ask how you want to be remembered?

There's no question but that time becomes more precious as one ages and for those of us, like you and me, who have been lucky to survive when so many of our peers did not, it only makes that sense more intense.

It is peculiar to think about how one would like to be remembered because, first of all, no one wants to be remembered for spending much time thinking about how they would like to be remembered. What is important is what I am doing today and if I'm doing that well, it won't matter how I'm remembered.

I think I'm going to start this piece by telling people about your kindness to me after my breakup. Would that embarrass you?

I'm beyond embarrassment, I think. And I could not be more proud of our friendship.

My Gonorrhea Nostalgia

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The first time I contracted gonorrhea, which in my day was affectionately called The Clap, I was 20 years old and had just moved to West Hollywood, California. It was 1981, disco was still thumping in the bars, and the bath houses were packed. My dance card was filled.

2 SU1HXzk4NjctMTEuanBnWhen I admitted my telltale symptoms to a friend, he directed me to the local clinic in the heart of the gay strip. The waiting area, filled to the brim with gay men, had the undeniable scent of Brut cologne and testosterone, and despite the circumstances we all cruised one another through sheepish glances.

It was embarrassing but not the worst day of my life. The clinician touched me in private places with rubber gloves and the shot he gave me worked. Life went on.

No one told me I should be using condoms, not in the clinic and not among friends. The very suggestion would have been ludicrous. Half the fun of being gay was the blithe disregard for rubbers. We knew the symptoms of trouble and dealt with it accordingly. An STI (sexually transmitted infection) was an annoying rite of passage and little more. We had not yet met a virus that could harm us in any significant way.

During my early years of recreational sex in the busy gay mecca, I caught The Clap so many times I called it The Applause.

Which brings me to a common objection to the use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for the prevention of HIV transmission. Skeptics of the strategy warn that taking a pill to prevent HIV does not guard against other STI's and therefore condoms must continue to be used.

When did avoiding every possible STI become the new goal for gay sexual behavior? Syphilis, chlamydia, and gonorrhea are all easily treated and cured. Scary campfire tales of a spreading superbug impervious to all treatment have failed to materialize. The very idea of getting The Clap again just makes me feel nostalgic.

No longer is avoiding HIV the prime objective; we must also now use a condom every time so that we are never exposed to, well, whatever. How many hoops must we jump through in order to fuck in a pleasurable way? We can't win for losing.

I'm beginning to wonder if the avoidance of pleasure has become the real objective; after a generation of fear and mortality, we don't see pleasure - and I mean sweaty nasty bodily fluid exploding pleasure - as a basic human need we can enjoy as gay men, much less deserve. Meanwhile, heterosexuals acquire STI's or get pregnant with the same regularity as always. Our gay sin is always greater.

Whatever moderate concern we once had for contracting an STI (and empathy for those getting one) has been transformed into a fearsome judgment of any repercussions of gay sex, regardless of its actual threat to our health. It's a shame-based, sex-negative ideology and it is painful to observe, particularly within my own community.

There are many ways to avoid HIV infection that can still give you an STI. That's true. And every person should engage in sober reflection and make their own assessment of what risks they are willing to take. I am a proponent of "shoot the alligator closest to the boat," meaning, prioritize the risk and act accordingly.

Gay men who take steps to avoid HIV practice a number of strategies: they choose PrEP, or limit themselves to oral sex with partners whom they don't know, or they only top, or they know their partner is undetectable, or they are themselves on successful treatment. All of these methods can prevent HIV transmission but can still expose someone to an STI.

I consider the man who employs these strategies, and maintains a relationship with his health care provider to monitor any infections, a success story. I have no interest in telling him to jump through a few more hoops if he wants to be truly, totally, super safe from all of life's ills. There is a cost to being human and of the pleasures we seek, whether it's sex or fast cars or that second piece of cake.

Unfortunately, because the topic is gay sexuality, it tends to make some of those alligators appear much larger than they really are.

Mark

This Teenage Couple Will School You Now

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When Chanse, a 19-year-old gay man living in Shreveport, Louisiana, tested HIV positive a few months ago, his mother reacted with understandable emotion and concern. And then she did something both odd and beautiful: she threw Chanse a coming out party.

"We had a couple of dozen family members and friends there," Chanse told me during my recent visit to my hometown. "And halfway through the party we started pinning red ribbons on everyone. They didn't know what to make of it."

Josh ChanseHis mother then called the group to attention and said she had an important announcement to make. "She wanted everyone to know that something had happened and I would need their support," he said. "And then she told them that I had tested positive and that she loves me."

The response from the party attendees was immediate and moving. There were tears, yes, but they also congratulated Chanse for taking charge of his health and starting treatment. Since then, several family members have begun to volunteer for The Philadelphia Center, the local HIV services agency where Chanse was tested and participates in ongoing wellness programs.

HIV continues to devastate the South with alarming infection rates. One might assume that in the most stubborn of Red States, gay men have lives of rejection and misery, that they are apathetic about HIV, that they are ignorant about seeking treatment or accessing prevention strategies such as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), or that living as a gay teenager brings so many challenges that HIV falls far down the ladder of priorities.

That is clearly not the case for Chanse or for his boyfriend Josh, also 19 years old, who both swept into action when Chanse tested positive and, in another room of the agency, Josh learned he was HIV negative.

"I told him right away that I wouldn't leave him," said Josh. "We cried in the hallways for a few minutes, and then we both wanted to know right away what to do about it. One of the men at the agency, Eric Evans, told me about PrEP. I did some research and knew I wanted to start taking it."

I am certainly guilty of making assumptions about the engagement of young gay men in the South. Having grown up in Shreveport, I assigned the same prejudices to the community that I endured when I came bursting out of the closet as a teenager in 1978. But Chanse and Josh were quick to correct my outdated notions.

"We have plenty of friends," Chanse told me. "And we walk down the street holding hands. I can't speak for everyone, but it just hasn't been a problem for us."

Josh has been on PrEP for a month now, and his own choices defy nearly every contention made by critics of the prevention strategy. He is compliant, takes his daily pill on schedule, and hasn't missed a dose yet. He takes the medication within the context of a committed relationship, not as a license for promiscuity. And taking the prevention measure hasn't meant abandoning condoms.

"Why would we stop using condoms?" Josh asked. "I know Chanse will be undetectable soon since he just started treatment, and I know PrEP is protecting me. But we're also in the habit of using condoms every time. If we don't have them, then we do something else. It's just what makes us both comfortable, and we're going to keep doing things the same way we always have."

As a middle-aged HIV activist, I thought I had an understanding of what it means to be gay in Louisiana and the level of commitment among young gay men.

But I was wrong. I just got schooled by two teenagers.

Mark

(I wish to thank the very good people of Allied Media Productions in Shreveport, Louisiana, for sharing this interview clip with me. They are real public servants, producing video content for agencies like The Philadelphia Center and The Deaf Action Center.)

The Woman Behind the Poetry of Poz Artist Mary Bowman

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When Mary E. Bowman stepped to the stage five years ago at SpitDat, an open mic night in Washington, DC, she was 20 years old and terrified. She was about to perform "Dandelions," her first poem to reveal a secret that her own family had long kept quiet: that Mary had lived with HIV since birth, the result of a mother addicted to drugs who died when Mary was only three.

MaryBowmanGrab"I had not memorized the poem yet," Mary told me, "and the paper I held was shaking. It is usually kind of a loud environment, but when I started to read, the room went silent. That made it even more nerve-wracking."

Mary was nervous about the audience response, about what they would say, and if any of them would even be her friend once her poem was done. She needn't have worried.

"It was such a loving environment," she said. "It was so accepting, like a family. When I was done, everyone applauded. I walked to my seat and a young lady was crying, and all she said to me was 'thank you.' I realized the poem wasn't just about me. It was about other people, too."

"Dandelions" explored her feelings about the mother Mary hardly knew, a loss that Mary has felt deeply her entire life. "I was eventually raised by my biological father," Mary explained. "He wasn't married to my mother. He would come to see me when I was a baby and find me on the sofa alone... and my mother out of the house."

Mary's father witnessed the scene "far too many times" and took the child home to his wife, who fell in love immediately and raised Mary as her own.

Mary's talent lies not only in her poetic words, but the sheer passionate force of the emotions behind them. It's impossible to watch her and not to be moved. She grabs you by the heart and doesn't let go.

Today, Mary works in policy and advocacy at The Women's Collective in Washington, DC, but only after spending her younger years without very much social support for her status. "My family was very quiet about HIV," she said. "Even when I was at the hospital growing up, I didn't have an outlet to talk about it."

Things have changed. In addition to her advocacy work, Mary has performed at HIV conferences and for events such as AIDSWatch in Washington. Her work as a performance artist and poet is a unique niche among young advocates, but it is when working with other women that the loss of her own mother sweeps over her.

A lot of the women have drug addiction histories. They have had their children taken away. "They are my support system," Mary says, "and it reminds me that my mother isn't here. They tell me stories. I just wish someone had saved my Mom as well. She didn't have the services available to her that they do now."

Working with these women has been a melancholy gift to the young artist.

"I've been caught up in emotion several times, when performing for women," she says, and their bond has become her only connection to a woman lost to time and sad circumstance. She pauses to consider the many faces of the women for whom she has recited "Dandelions."

"They are my mother," she adds.

Mark

Dandelions

A dandelion in the midst of rose bushes would stick out like a sore thumb to ignorant souls
But I know the road this dandelion endured
This weed that all gardeners want to destroy is more appreciated by God than any seemingly beautiful bush of roses
Though that misunderstood dandelion wont for long last
Let it be known that God gave it the role of the outcast for divine importance
My mother was a dandelion in the midst of roses
Ignorant of her purpose she uprooted her soul and unknowingly left herself for dead
It has been said that my mother when above the influence transmuted broken hearts into smiles
All the while dying on the inside
AIDS didn't kill my mother
It put her at rest
Now this song bird whistles in the key of silence
And I the latter of five write poems documenting the struggle unknown to my family
The sickness she denied lies in my blood with a lesser value
People speak I don't know how you can live with knowing nothing but owning the growing disease that your mother for so long fought
But see that's the difference between a rose and a dandelion
Roses were created with thorns to warn hand approaching without caution
Dandelions were not given that option
But they were created by an all knowing God
And that all knowing God created dandelions with the strength to withstand ignorance and hatred
Dandelions live in this matrix of life understanding the price
Roses live like the world was handed
Dandelions take the world and won't leave a rose stranded
But my mother died before she got the chance to realize that dandelions are blessings in disguise
She I dare say died before her time
That thought lingers in my mind conflicting my belief in the divine
My mama raised me in the faith that the day God sweeps you away is a day proclaimed way before the manifestation
But I can't help but experience devastation knowing nothing about the woman who carried me toting guns in the defense of my father
It is even harder knowing nothing about her but knowing the reason the hospital has become my second home is because this dandelion
chose to roam with the buffalo
But I seek serenity in the fact that she just didn't know
That she a dandelion was just as beautiful as a rose
And I will go forth knowing my purpose as a dandelion
This life is worth all the crying and all the dying I have to do just so someone in my shoes can live
I will gladly give myself as the sacrifice if it means that all the dandelions in the world become viewed as more than the consequence of sins behind closed doors
You can lay me on my back and present me life less to God if it means that dandelions with unseen scares will not be viewed as odd
But as gifts from God to show the world that beauty lies not in the pedals of flowers but in the power of unconditional love
And in the strength of the untouched, un-hugged, sometimes unloved but most important of all un-budged dandelions

Michael Loves Tyler: A Very Modern HIV Romance

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Tyler Helms won't stop teasing his boyfriend during our video chat interview. He fiddles with Michael's ear, or tickles his face, from his seat slightly behind him. No matter if Michael Lucas, adult film producer and PrEP user, is trying to make a point. The childish joy of a relatively new love is at play, and Tyler can't help himself. It's adorable and telling.

ML&TJHWe've been meaning to conduct the interview for months, but they wanted time to enjoy their budding relationship before discussing it publicly. That bud is now in full bloom, it would appear. They are both open and approachable, allowing me to get away with a lot of very personal questions.

Yes, there is the prurient intrigue of Michael being a famous gay porn star, and how that impacts their relationship. But what truly interests me is the fact they are engaged in the most modern of gay romances. It isn't simply because one of them is HIV positive and the other negative. It's about what they are doing about it. Between them, they are practicing both of the most exciting developments in HIV prevention of the last generation. They're an HIV prevention two-for-one.

"We're taking our time," Tyler says. But that's not keeping them from spending nearly every night together and constantly keeping in touch.

Their love affair elicits some interesting reactions among their friends. Some of them patronize Michael, as if being in a relationship with a man living with HIV was an act of charity. "People say, 'oh, good for you,' as if it's something special," says Michael. He shakes his head. "I'm not performing an heroic act."

"There's a whole lot more that needs to happen in our community," Tyler adds. He is a formidable advocate in his own right (he serves on the board of GMHC), but one whose visibility has risen further since his new relationship began. "We need to talk about the modern day face of HIV," he insists.

Tyler was infected in 2007, and it came as some surprise. "I was tested every three months and was in a committed relationship," he says. It is a common story, actually, because one of the leading risk factors of HIV infection is via a primary partner, such as a lover or fuck buddy.

Whatever the circumstances, Tyler is entirely at peace with it today. "I'm only on Atripla," he says, "and it made me crazy for a few months. But now I'm better than ever and have been undetectable for two years." Because Tyler is undetectable, research shows there is no real risk of transmitting HIV to his partner.

Treating people with HIV to reduce their virus to undetectable levels so they can't infect others is known as "Treatment as Prevention," or TasP, and it has become a majorpublic health strategy since studies proved its effectiveness.

On a personal level, "HIV is really a moot issue between us," Tyler says. The topic of HIV may be resolved between them, but that hasn't kept them both from discussing their sexual choices and risk strategies in very public forums.

Michael has been using PrEP for some time now, and has bartered his notoriety to voice his strong beliefs about it. For that matter, Michael has strong beliefs about a lot of things, including his unwavering support for Israel. He even produced the mainstream documentary, "Undressing Israel: Gay Men in the Promised Land."

"Oh yes," Tyler interjects slyly when that topic, and the views for which Michael has been both heralded and vilified, come up. "Do ask about Israel!" He grins at the more serious Michael, and pokes him again. It's hard to imagine anyone else who might get away with it, teasing Michael about his passions. But Michael takes it in affectionate stride and allows himself a grin of his own.

I turn to Michael's profession and ask about it gingerly, as if it's a careful secret or something. I really could use more experience speaking to porn stars.

Michael Lucas 5"I'm used to being defined as a porn star," Michael says easily. "I would not have the platform I have without that. My opinions would only be in the comments section. But I write under my own name, and I use my platform to discuss things I am passionate about. And I do my research."

That research is evident in a number of articles Michael has authored about his use ofPrEP, or pre-exposure prophylaxisthrough the use of the medication Truvada on a daily basis. Research shows PrEP is effective in preventing transmission into the high 90% range, and there is an enormous pushamong community advocates for the adoption of PrEP for those at risk. It sits alongside TasP as the other most promising HIV prevention strategy -- one for those living with HIV and the other for those who are not -- and Michael appreciates the piece of mind it provides.

"People ask me all the time, 'are you nervous?' People of my generation saw the dying and I was always scared of becoming HIV positive," Michael says. "It was in the back of my mind all the time. So people ask that question, but it's only because they don't know the new data and research about PrEP."

His taking PrEP, though, actually has little to do with Michael's HIV positive boyfriend. "If I was only having sex with Tyler, I would not be taking PrEP," Michael says simply. "I know there is no way for a person who is undetectable to transmit to me. I believe in science."

Science aside, I have to ask Tyler how he feels about Michael occasionally stepping in front of the cameras for porn scenes. His response is without alarm or even a hint of jealousy. "I've never dated someone who does porn," he says, "but it's just not something I think about." It does come with plenty of assumptions from others, however.

"The most misunderstood thing about us," Tyler says, "is that people assume our relationship is purely sex-based. Some people don't understand it. They think Michael must have sex constantly, which is untrue."

"Most people I know have more sex than I do," Michael interjects. "With Grindr, people can have sex nonstop. I can't reach some of my friends anymore because they're on Grindr getting laid."

"Michael is rarely on set," adds Tyler. "His main job is the corporation." That company,Lucas Entertainment (NSFW), has become a leading adult film production outfit, and recently made the controversial change to produce gay porn without condoms, a reflection of Michael's belief in other prevention methods like PrEP and TasP.

"I recommend and talk to my actors about PrEP," he says. "I know a lot of people on it." While Michael has been quoted as saying that porn, bareback or not, is a fantasy intended only to help men get off, he certainly hasn't shied away from promoting options that make unprotected sex considerably safer.

So, somewhere along the road of their individual advocacy work, about a year ago, the two men and their respective prevention techniques ran across one another on Tinder, which seems almost quaint, and very of-the-moment. It wasn't a hookup.

"I liked his profile," says Michael, and he searches his phone and finds the wording of it. "It says he is 'a loyal and kind friend, passionate and selfless about a few things here and there.' There was maturity in that. No matter how much I'm attracted to someone, you have to be mature. That's Tyler."

They eye each other knowingly. "I believe it takes a lot of time to know a person," Michael says finally. "Don't confuse sexual attraction with real love."

Two men, engaged in their own intimacies while allowing their sexual choices to be laid bare for all to see. It can't always be comfortable for them.

It's usually a fool's errand to make assumptions about the private lives of public people, and the happy couple I have been watching in our video chat is no exception. You would probably get it wrong anyway, if you were to attempt to translate their public image -- the advocate living with HIV and the opinionated porn star provocateur -- into their authentic identities.

"I believe in love," Tyler says, and he stops tickling Michael's ear for a moment. He takes a look at the object of his new romance and smiles. "But I think Michael believes in love even more than me."

Mark



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