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GLAAD Media Awards Dump Grassroots Voices

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The Outstanding Blog category has been eliminated from the newly announced GLAAD Media Awards, and along with it the grassroots first-person voices of writers across the entire LGBT spectrum, including those of us living with HIV.  

I was honored to be a 2015 nominee in the Outstanding Blog category, and although I couldn't afford to attend (the event is a fundraiser, after all, as explained to nominees when GLAAD declined to provide comp tickets), I truly appreciated the fact GLAAD shined a spotlight on our work. Well, maybe we didn't sell enough seats to the dinner, despite multiple emails from GLAAD last year urging me to buy a table.

Communications director Seth Adam tells me that "online journalism" and "blogging" have become indistinguishable in the media landscape. That's ridiculous. Not only do we, as bloggers, provide a voice of lived experience not featured in mainstream outlets, we are without the resources to compete with the likes of The New York Times, MSNBC, and other online journalism nominees.  

Folding blogs into the online journalism category is a disingenuous ploy; not a single past nominee or winner for Outstanding Blog is present anywhere on the 2016 list of award nominees.

GLAAD hasn't simply marginalized the unique voice of bloggers. They have rendered us dispensable and ultimately invisible. It's shameful that a national organization that purports to lift up LGBT voices has dismissed the very people and outlets that deserve encouragement and recognition.

But hey, won't the GLAAD award race between Carol and The Danish Girl be a tight one? Maybe Eddie Redmayne will show up to the awards. That would be just the sort of evening GLAAD is hoping for.

I Watched Charlie Sheen on The Dr. Oz Show So You Don't Have To

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Dr. Oz has a very strange verbal compulsion. He can't stop making lame metaphors.

When taking an early morning jog with Charlie Sheen, in the first of their two-part interview for The Dr. Oz Show, the doctor sees metaphors everywhere. "You have to look down so you don't see how steep the hill is," he says as they putter upwards. "It's sort of like life, isn't it?"

Descending the hill sparks another metaphoric burst from the talk show physician.  "It's always easier going downhill," he says to Charlie. "What's going downhill like now that you're public about your HIV?" 

It became tough not to participate. Oh look, doctor. A rock. It's like the hard place Charlie has found himself. Or maybe it's the blunt instrument I will use to bash my head in after watching this inane, dangerously misinformed interview.

I had such high hopes. Charlie's coming out interview on The Today Show was as focused and informative as anyone could have expected from the troubled star. I was actually moved by Charlie's discomfort, and related to his obvious apprehension about making such a public disclosure. Better yet, the interview had the entire world talking about the meaning of "undetectable viral load," something I never saw coming and a great service to HIV education.

Well, it was great while it lasted. I am dismayed to report that Tiger Blood Charlie is back and he has gone rogue. And his Chasing the Cure! conversation with Dr. Oz might be the worst thing to ever happen to AIDS cure research, or at least the most irresponsible reporting about it.

But first, before the TV show bothers to get to the "provocative development in his search for a cure," we must wade through the first hour and tour the home of the we're-pretty-sure-he's-not-batshit-crazy-anymore star. He makes healthy shakes! He loves movies! He throws a baseball! Hey, there's the tastefully appointed bedroom where he banged and allegedly assaulted women!

Charlie does discuss his treatment and their side effects. "Poopy pants," he reveals. His advice is to wear black underwear. I intend to contact Treatment Action Group immediately to share this revelation.

To his minimal credit, Dr. Oz shows concern for the various addictions of his guest, from gambling to cocaine, but his light touch suggests this circus can't afford for the star to bolt. Never mind that Charlie claims he only stopped drinking once the Today Show interview was complete, and that he has tried to stop "hundreds of times" before. Appearing on national television is apparently much more therapeutic than finding the nearest rehab facility.

But on to the second hour, an in-studio interview with a live audience. This is where it gets really interesting -- and gruesome and creepy and utterly insane.

Dr. Oz revisits Charlie's hard-partying lifestyle and then asks him more questions about the horrendous, terrible news that he tested positive. The sum of the conversation was that Charlie Sheen's diagnosis - and by extension, all of us living with HIV - is comeuppance for his crimes against nature. 

But the best was yet to come. Finally, well into the second hour, Charlie reveals that his Chasing the Cure! led him not to actual experts in the field, but to Dr. Samir Chachoua, a doctor in Mexico about which little is known, except that he resembles Grizzly Adams after a hard night in Tijuana. Charlie had such faith in his quest that he stopped taking his medications in anticipation of seeing this nut.

And this Doctor of Quackery, in a phone interview with Dr. Oz, claims to have cured Charlie of HIV. "He's the first person in history to go HIV negative," says the Mexican madman, apparently unaware of the name Timothy Ray Brown. It's like a crazytown online denialist come to life. But wait, there's more.

Chachoua says, and Charlie concurs, that he drew blood from Charlie and then injected it into himself to prove his case, and that Charlie remained undetectable. Never mind that this was mere days after Charlie had discontinued his meds, which surely were still working in his bloodstream. The entire, bizarre scenario was like something out of American Horror Story: AIDS.

Back in the studio, Charlie's own doctors reveal that his viral load has spiked again. His personal physician pleads with Charlie to go back on his meds. Charlie sunnily agrees. "What, am I crazy?" he jokes, to scattered, confused applause. Thus ends his first chapter of Chasing a Cure!

I prayed that Dr Oz would then introduce someone from the American Foundation for AIDS Research (AmFAR) to preset real facts about the current state of cure studies. Wouldn't treatment activism icon Peter Staley make an excellent guest? David Evans from Project Inform? Please God, anyone. My prayers went unanswered.

Instead, Dr Oz turns from the actual physicians in the studio to pursue a far more important line of questioning. At this critical juncture in the interview, it was important to discuss movies.

"You describe your journey, chasing a cure for HIV," Dr. Oz says in his most empathetic voice, "in a way that is similar to your dad's journey in Apocalypse Now." I'm sure Martin Sheen watched with pride, knowing his film career had become relevant again. "Has your diagnosis with HIV brought you closer to him?" The camera moves in to Charlie greedily. 

Somewhere Barbara Walters was rummaging through her penthouse for a rope to hang herself.

There were actually a group of HIV positive women in the studio that day, some representing Positive Women's Network, and during the taping they were given the opportunity to offer what was undoubtedly some much-needed perspective. But evidently they had nothing to say about Apocalypse Now or they were really bad at metaphors, because the segment was cut from the broadcast.

Charlie Sheen isn't going anywhere soon. There is always hope he may regain his senses and become the high-profile cure advocate we need. But what we are currently witnessing is the exploitation of a deeply troubled man with multiple addictions. 

Whether Charlie Sheen follows the path of other distressed celebrities, be it recovering addict Robert Downey Jr. or the very dead Amy Winehouse, remains to be seen.

The Man Who Buried Them Remembers

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When he conducted the funerals, Tom Bonderenko tells me, he always wore his priestly garments and white stole. Even when no one showed up for the graveside service.

"It was important to show dignity and respect," Tom says. He taps the coffee cup in his lap nervously. "I'm sorry," he says. He clears his throat but it doesn't keep his eyes from welling up. "No one has asked me about this in a really long time."

We are sitting in his office at Moveable Feast, the Baltimore meal delivery agency for those with life-threatening illnesses, where Tom has served as director for the last eight years. His office is spacious and cheerful, but this conversation is a difficult one. He had discreetly closed his office door behind me when I arrived.

When Moveable Feast was founded in 1989 to deliver meals to home-bound AIDS patients, Tom was engaged in a different, more literal ministry to the disenfranchised. He was a priest staffing a homeless shelter for Catholic Charities of Baltimore. It was there he met someone with AIDS for the first time.

"A young man came to the door of the emergency shelter, sometime in 1987," he says. "He was covered in black marks. Lesions, you know. Everywhere. He said he needed to clean up before his first doctor appointment the next day."

Tom had grown up in New York City, and as a gay man he had known people who died very suddenly, as far back as the early 1980's. But he had never stood face to face with someone so ill with the dreaded disease.

I couldn't help but ask Tom how he felt, meeting that person.

TomTom stares out his office window, and his eyes are so beautiful, romantically blue, framed with creases of worry. The eyes of a priest. He turns back to me with an answer. "Here was a young man who was going to find out from a doctor the next day that he had AIDS," he manages. He starts tapping his coffee cup again, and he bows his head reverently. "And he was about to be told that he was going to die."

Tom never saw the young man again.

People with AIDS became more common at the shelter before long. Tom got to know the regulars, and they began to ask him to perform their funeral services.

"They just wanted to know they would be buried," he says quietly. "They didn't want or need anything religious. Most of them were estranged from their families, drug abuse, that sort of thing. I think they were embarrassed to reach out to relatives. Sometimes, when they died we would find a member of the family to come, but usually it was just me and the departed at the gravesite."

The burials were performed at unmarked graves in a lonely section of Baltimore Cemetery. The caskets were as charity required, simple wooden boxes, and they always contained a body. The funeral home would not cremate someone who died from AIDS because they were afraid of poisoning the air.

"I would always conduct the service out loud," says Tom, now sharing the sacred details. "I would speak about the departed, and say what I knew of them, about where they were from. And then I would ask if anyone present had been harmed by the departed..."

I imagined Tom, in his vestments and alone in a forgotten graveyard, asking intimate questions out loud to the grass and the trees and the disinterested silence. "I would say that if the departed had harmed anyone," he goes on, "for that person to please forgive them." Tom's voice falters. "And then I would ask the departed to forgive, too. I would tell them, 'you're on the other side now. Let it go.'"

Tom B-2Tom's office becomes very still. I feel as if I'm holding my breath.

"I think they just didn't want to be alone," Tom says, and now he looks at me without regard for his tears. "We don't do this alone."

Because of you, I think to myself. They weren't alone because of you, Tom.

"I'm so sorry," he says, again, wiping his face. "I haven't talked about this in so long." He considers the faraway scene he has conjured, his graveside questions to no one, and then adds, "It was the most important, meaningful thing I have ever done."

I wonder aloud if the experience bolstered his religious faith or challenged it instead. He looks surprised by the question. "Well," he answers after a moment, "I believe it strengthened my faith. Yes." I want very much to believe him.

Tom left Catholic Charities, and the priesthood, not long after he conducted the last of his burials for the homeless. A decade later he joined Moveable Feast and embraced its mission to provide sustenance for people in need, people like those to whom he once ministered.

Tom's fellow staff members know little about his life a generation ago. Most of them aren't aware of the aching memories beneath the calm surface of their sensitive and capable boss. They may not fully understand why Tom leaves the office once a month to distribute food personally to homebound clients.

But they will tell you that when Tom Bonderenko returns from those deliveries, he always has tears in his eyes.

Mark


(I was struck when Tom said to me, "No one has asked me about this in a really long time," because there are so many more stories out there for the asking. We only have to reach out. I hope you take any opportunity to have a conversation with someone "who was there." This history must be chronicled and preserved. -- Mark)

Five Things I Learned Aboard the HIV Cruise Retreat

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Each year, several hundred people living with HIV - primarily gay men, with a happy sprinkling of straight women and our supporters - embark on the HIV Cruise Retreat (known as "The Poz Cruise" but not associated with POZ Magazine) for a week of fun and frolic on the high seas. The event started with a group of HIV positive friends and has grown enormously over more than a dozen years. The week is organized by one travel agent and a team of dedicated volunteers (and that includes me as one of the hosts and MC).

The days and nights are packed with exclusive shore excursions, private parties and all the perks of being aboard a large passenger ship -- but nothing can compete with the freedom of making new friends without fearing HIV disclosure or stigma.

Here are five things I have learned aboard the HIV Cruise Retreat.

12241319_10207095287733599_1258243416563954974_n1. We'll take a party over another medical seminar, thank you.

Poz guys are as educated about our condition as ever before, and we're no longer clamoring for the very latest bits of information. Gone are the medical update lectures that were once a staple of the week-long Poz Cruise, replaced with more socials (like the infamous Red Party, right) and events like the Dating Game.

2. When searching for friendship, cast a wide net.

Years ago, the Poz Cruise provided separate events for the gay men and the (mostly female) heterosexuals. It just didn't feel right to be kept apart. The gays actually loved the sense of family the women brought onboard, and the women loved our joy and uncanny ability to nail loungewear. The groups joined forces, and today some of the deepest bonding has nothing to do with sexual orientation or any of the other ways in which we often separate ourselves from potential friendships. It's an important lesson for us all.

 

3. A zip line is the great equalizer.

It does not matter if that hunk you have been cruising by the pool puts the mucho in macho. When you have been pushed off a wooden platform a million feet above the ground and are whizzing across a thin steel cable, everyone screams like a girl. Not that there's anything wrong with that. (There's some rather acrobatic zip lining happening in the cruise video, above.)

Mud Masks4. Long term survivors are particularly hungry for community.

Growing older is never a picnic - and that goes double for a gay man - but long-term HIV survivors have additional challenges ranging from survivor's guilt to post-traumatic stress disorder. "Long time survivors really love the idea of getting away from it all with friends who really get it," said Paul Stalbaum, the travel agent who has organized the Poz Cruise for the last 12 years and is a longtime survivor himself. "That may be why so many 'men of a certain age' join the Poz Cruise each year," Stalbaum added. "The older survivors bond over shared histories while the younger cruisers have a ready-made group of mature friends and mentors." If everyone rallies together for an afternoon of mud masks on the beach (above), all the better.

5. Sharing our greatest challenge is the very thing than can help someone else.

Before I said a word to other cruisers, I already knew them. Or at least, I knew a large and significant part of their lives. Being in each other's company, whether or not the topic of HIV came up in conversation, brought a kind of immediate intimacy that is difficult to describe. It reminded me that the meaning of life is to take that about which we have the most shame or difficulty and use it as a tool to help someone else.

The 2016 HIV Cruise Retreat is a Caribbean voyage from Ft. Lauderdale, October 29 - November 6th. Find out more here or contact agent Paul Stalbaum at 888-640-7447.

How Do We Solve a Problem Like Pintauro?

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My discomfort began as I sat in front of my web cam, waiting to join Danny Pintauro in a segment on Huffington Post Live. Danny had recently announced on an Oprah special that he was living with HIV, which was big news for fans of "Who's the Boss?" and those who loved the precocious little boy Danny played. Before my virtual entrance, Danny was telling host Nancy Redd how he was infected with HIV.

Grabbed Frame 1He wanted to explore "rougher sides" of his sexuality, he explained. And wouldn't you know it, the first guy he hooks up with for that purpose offers him crystal meth. "And you combine meth, which completely ruins your immune system," he said earnestly, "you combine having been up a good 12 or 13 hours... you combine that with some rough but safe sex, believe it or not, and it's just a potent combination."

My jaw dropped. Did Danny Pintauro just attribute his HIV infection to using meth and being tired? Did he just say that he had safe sex, "believe it or not?"

No, Danny. I don't believe it.  While gay meth addicts are many times more likely to test HIV positive, it is because they engage in high risk behaviors, specifically unprotected anal sex, and not because they missed a good night's sleep.

Danny went on to explain, or at least presume, that his sex partner's viral load "had to have been very high, because that's the easiest way to contract it if you're not being unsafe."

I was incredulous. I began to mentally prepare retorts to the celebrity. If you are not being unsafe, Danny, you will not become infected with HIV, regardless of your partner's viral load. Prevention is a two-way street. Your partner posed no threat to you if you were being safe, which you say you were. Which is ludicrous because you were high on crystal meth, a sex drug known for evaporating condoms instantaneously. Statements like "we were safe, believe it or not" would be pure comedy gold at any Crystal Meth Anonymous meeting.

14616But I actually said nothing to challenge his statements.  When I appeared on the segment a few minutes later, I welcomed Danny to the world of poz activism and identified myself as a fellow meth addict in recovery. I then threw out an inane softball question to our newly-minted HIV positive celebrity/cautionary tale, because, well, he was on a popular sitcom and has the power to reach a lot of people. And because I totally wimped out.

We don't always get the spokesperson we want. We have to work with the celebrity we are dealt (ask any transgender activist in this Year of Caitlyn). And it's unfair to expect a random person with a celebrity past to be conversant on every aspect of HIV important to us. Besides, Danny's messaging around meth and gay men alone is worthy of our gratitude.

It is also true that Danny has set himself up for criticism and judgments. In a universally vilified segment on The View, one of the hosts, a breathtakingly clueless idiot named Candace Cameron Bure, challenged Danny to "take responsibility" for his actions, as if she had just nabbed an interview with the latest mass shooter.

If that was your last exposure to Mr. Pintauro, you're probably feeling for him about now. So was I. That is, until he doubled down on his "I had safe sex" statements by telling US Magazine that not only had he been a condom-loving crystal meth addict, he was actually infected through oral sex.

I better take a breath here. Ahem. Okay. Moving on.

There's no way to know the level of shame Danny Pintauro may be feeling around his addiction and HIV infection. And he must sincerely value his beloved place in television pop culture and hate to discolor it with his personal revelations. That took courage.

But attributing his HIV infection to the infinitesimal risk of oral sex - because God forbid anyone picture the former child actor taking bare dick and semen up his ass - isn't the kind of transparency needed for a gay, HIV positive spokesperson.

And then, oddly, Danny added in his US Magazine interview that the "irresponsible" man he believes infected him -- whose name escaped Danny for many years -- has been on his mind and he has been trying to find him, even searching through obituaries and what-not.

Danny's strange fixation suggests a blame game that goes beyond Danny's assertion that he just wants to be sure the guy "is okay." Let us all hope that the man in question is living a healthy life somewhere, safe from Danny's well-intentioned but pointless quest to contact him.

That man deserves his privacy at least as much as Danny Pintauro deserves his rocky, vexing media tour.

Mark

VIDEO: The 2015 US Conference on AIDS

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Not to get all southern gothic on you, but I depend upon the kindness of strangers. Especially when producing video blogs at conferences.

Social to Mobile selfie"Excuse me, would you please just hold this camera and point it at me while I talk to these people?" I must have said that sentence at least 40 times during the United States Conference on AIDS (USCA), held recently in Washington, DC. Every single interview you see in my video blog below was shot by whomever was wandering by at the time. Thanks, y'all!

The video contains three AIDS czars, one stripper pole, a ferocious batch of trans protestors, and more inspirational front-line workers than you can shake a stick at. My congratulations to the National Minority AIDS Council for their famously creative production of the weekend.

 

The spirit shared by the advocates, healthcare providers, and organizations who convened for USCA was electrifying, and just the boost many of us need to keep our energy up and our dedication renewed.

Oh, and special thanks to the CDC's Act Against AIDS campaign for letting me take over their Instagram page during the conference (follow them here), and to Gilead Sciences for sponsoring the "Mind the Gap" session on social media and inviting me to host it.

I love what I do. I love the work you're doing, too. As always, you are welcome to re-post my content, share it, take the YouTube video above and post it within your page, whatever might help share the messages of this amazing event and the awesome people who attended.

Thanks, my friends, and please be well.

Mark

(The photo above was the selfie the Social to Mobile speakers took at the end of our session, and includes - left to right - YouTube star Davey Wavey, blogger Guy Anthony, Michelle Samplin-Salgado of AIDS.govLuvvie Ajayi of the Red Pump Project, Miguel Gomez ofAIDS.gov, myself, and Michael Crawford from Freedom to Marry.)



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